Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Medical and Hospital News  


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















INTERN DAILY
Catching heartbeats with millimeter-wave radar
by Staff Writers
Kyoto, Japan (SPX) Jan 25, 2016


Japanese researchers have come up with a way to measure heartbeats remotely, in real time, and under controlled conditions with as much accuracy as electrocardiographs. The technology utilizes spread-spectrum radar to catch signals from the body and an algorithm that distinguishes heartbeats from other signals. Image courtesy Kyoto University. For a larger version of this image please go here.

Heartbeats can now be measured without placing sensors on the body, thanks to a new technology developed in Japan. Researchers at the Kyoto University Center of Innovation, together with Panasonic Corp, have come up with a way to measure heartbeats remotely, in real time, and under controlled conditions with as much accuracy as electrocardiographs.

The researchers say this will allow for the development of "casual sensing" - taking measurements as people go about their daily activities, for instance, when they are going to bed or getting ready to start the day.

"Taking measurements with sensors on the body can be stressful and troublesome, because you have to stop what you're doing," says Hiroyuki Sakai, a researcher at Panasonic. "What we tried to make was something that would offer people a way to monitor their body in a casual and relaxed environment."

The added convenience of remote sensing, the team believes, will be an incentive for people to monitor their health status for their own benefit.

The remote sensing system combines millimeter-wave spread-spectrum radar technology and a unique signal analysis algorithm that identify signals from the body.

"Heartbeats aren't the only signals the radar catches. The body sends out all sorts of signals at once, including breathing and body movement. It's a chaotic soup of information," says Toru Sato, professor of communications and computer engineering at Kyoto University. "Our algorithm differentiates all of that. It extracts waves characteristic of heart beats from the radar signal and calculates their intervals."

The team hopes that the remote sensing system, with further experimentation, will be put to practical use in the near future.

"Now that we know that remote sensing is possible, we'll need to make the measurement ability more robust so that the system can monitor subjects in various age ranges and in many different contexts," Sato concluded.

.


Related Links
Kyoto University
Hospital and Medical News at InternDaily.com






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Previous Report
INTERN DAILY
Italian group to build five hospitals in Iran
Milan (AFP) Jan 20, 2016
Italian group BTP said Tuesday it had signed a preliminary agreement with Iran to build five hospitals, just after the lifting of economic sanctions against Tehran in a deal over its nuclear programme. Pessina Costruzioni will build the first three 1,000-bed hospitals in Tehran. Two other 500-bed facilities will be provided in Rasht and Nishapur. Italian industries have high hopes f ... read more


INTERN DAILY
Charities warn of 'desperate' plight of refugees in snow

Nepal quake rebuilding to take years, new chief says

MH370 search finds new shipwreck, but no plane

Six years on, quake-devastated Haiti mourns its dead

INTERN DAILY
Trimble to provide GPS survey systems for U.S. Marines

SMC releases RFP for GPS III Space Vehicles

GPS vultures swoop down on illegal dumps in Peru

Northrop Grumman to support U.S. Air Force GPS modernization

INTERN DAILY
Why are habits so hard to break

Evidence of a prehistoric massacre extends the history of warfare

Neolithic tomb reveals community stayed together, even in death

Dartmouth study helps fill in gaps in our visual perception

INTERN DAILY
Newly discovered photosynthetic bacteria is surprisingly abundant

Rare muriqui monkey hideout found in Brazil

1,175 rhinos killed by poachers in S.Africa last year

Mild winter sees Pyrenees brown bears avoid hibernation

INTERN DAILY
11 swine flu deaths in Syria since September: health ministry

US Army probe blames leadership in anthrax shipment scandal

Ebola epidemic is over but expect flare-ups: UN

Experimental immunotherapy zaps 2 most lethal Ebola virus strains

INTERN DAILY
Sanction Chinese state media: advocacy group

EU has 'deep concerns' about China's detention of Europeans

China clothing tycoon back at work after vanishing

Swedish activist detained in China accused of 'inciting opposition'

INTERN DAILY
Two Mexican marines, suspect killed in shootout

U.S., U.K. help build West African partners' anti-piracy capabilities

INTERN DAILY
China 2015 growth slows to weakest for 25 years: govt

If it's the economy, stupid, what can be done?

German businesses put on brave face amid China's economic slowdown

China growth slides to 25-year low in 2015: AFP survey




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News








The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2016 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.