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Diabetes rises in China, reaching 'alert' level
by Staff Writers
Washington, District Of Columbia (AFP) Sept 04, 2013

China state media raises pressure on Britain's GSK
Shanghai, China (AFP) Sept 03, 2013 - Chinese state media increased the pressure on British pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) over a bribery investigation Tuesday, accusing the firm of being responsible rather than individual employees.

The inquiry into GSK comes as authorities target foreign firms in fields ranging from medicines to food, sometimes for what analysts say is standard practice engaged in on a larger scale by domestic companies.

Police have already accused GSK staff of offering doctors bribes to prescribe its products and detained four executives.

But the official Xinhua news agency said: "As the investigation is moving on, it is becoming clear that it is organised by GSK China rather than drug salespeople's individual behaviour."

GSK has previously admitted that some of its executives broke Chinese law.

In a statement issued Tuesday, GSK said it was concerned about allegations of misconduct and would cooperate with the police investigation.

"We remain deeply concerned by the allegations of fraudulent behaviour and ethical misconduct in our China business," it said.

"The issues identified would be a clear breach of our corporate values and we have zero tolerance for any behaviour of this nature."

Xinhua cited one of the detained GSK officials, general manager for business development Huang Hong, as saying the company set up a special team to handle important clients which had an annual "relations" budget of nearly 10 million yuan ($1.6 million).

The report did not say those funds were used for bribes.

Sales growth targets set by the firm as high as 25 percent put pressure on employees, Xinhua quoted Huang as saying.

"If we didn't have... enough input into safeguarding customer relations, using some methods that broke the rules, it would be hard to meet such high sales growth targets," she added.

A travel agency which allegedly served as a conduit for bribes to doctors also gave GSK executives kickbacks in return for business, Xinhua said.

The Shanghai Linjiang International Travel Agency -- which has already been shut by authorities -- gave more than 2.0 million yuan to GSK vice president Liang Hong, who has also been detained, the report said, and at least two other executives.

Police in Shanghai, who are leading the investigation, could not be reached for comment.

At the same time as investigating GSK, Chinese authorities are mounting a broader probe into foreign pharmaceutical firms' pricing in the country.

US drugmaker Eli Lilly and France's Sanofi have both come under scrutiny after anonymous whistleblowers cited by Chinese state media claimed that employees paid bribes.

Eli Lilly said it was investigating, while Sanofi said it was taking the claims "seriously".

Almost 12 percent of adults in China had diabetes in 2010, with economic prosperity driving the disease to slightly higher proportions than in the United States, researchers said Tuesday.

The overall prevalence of diabetes in China in 2010 was found to be 11.6 percent of adults -- 12.1 percent in men, and 11 percent in women, according to the study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

In the United States, about 11.3 percent of people over 20 have diabetes according to 2011 data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The disease was more common in China than in the United States even though the population was slimmer -- average body mass index, a ratio of height and body weight, was just 23.7 in China compared to 28.7 in the United States.

"The prevalence of diabetes has increased significantly in recent decades," said the JAMA study.

"These data suggest that diabetes may have reached an alert level in the Chinese general population, with the potential for a major epidemic of diabetes-related complications, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, and chronic kidney disease in China in the near future without an effective national intervention."

Only 30 percent of Chinese with diabetes were aware of their condition, it said.

Further, about half of the population has high blood sugar, or a condition known as prediabetes, according to a nationally representative sample of Chinese adults.

Diabetes has been rising in China along with the nation's economic growth. In 1980, the prevalence of diabetes was less than one percent of the population.

The latest findings mark a more than two percentage point increase over 2007, when a national survey found a 9.7 percent prevalence of diabetes, or about 92.5 million adults.

The current data puts the total number of cases of diabetes in China at 113.9 million.

Worldwide, diabetes affects about 8.3 percent of the global population, or 371 million people.

"China is now among the countries with the highest diabetes prevalence in Asia and has the largest absolute disease burden of diabetes in the world," said the study.

The Chinese survey included more than 98,650 people and was led by Guang Ning, head of the Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases and colleagues with the 2010 China Noncommunicable Disease Surveillance Group.

Diabetes was more common in urban areas and among young and middle aged people who were overweight or obese, and was found to be increasing along with economic development.

The research suggested that one cause for the growing trend could be poor nutrition among pregnant women and young babies, combined with overeating later in life.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of the disease, and can be managed with improved nutrition and exercise, as well as medication if needed.

According to an accompanying editorial in JAMA by Juliana Chan of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, "rapid modernization" has fueled an environment that encourages diabetes "characterized by food abundance, physical inactivity, and psychosocial stress."

The CDC says that diabetes is a top cause of blindness, kidney failure and amputations of the legs and feet, and was the seventh leading cause of death in the US in 2007.

One in three US adults will have diabetes by 2050 if current trends continue, according to the CDC.

The disease is characterized by the body's shortage of insulin, or an inability to use the hormone efficiently for converting glucose into energy.


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Shanghai (AFP) Aug 23, 2013
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