. Medical and Hospital News .

Sound bullets in water
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Nov 22, 2012

These intense pressure waves may be used to obliterate tumors or kidney stones - leaving surrounding tissues unharmed - or probe objects like ship hulls or bridges for unseen defects.

Sound waves are commonly used in applications ranging from ultrasound imaging to hyperthermia therapy, in which high temperatures are induced, for example, in tumors to destroy them. In 2010, researchers at Caltech led by Chiara Daraio, a professor of aeronautics and applied physics, developed a nonlinear acoustic lens that can focus high-amplitude pressure pulses into compact "sound bullets."

In that initial work, the scientists demonstrated how sound bullets form in solids. Now, they have done themselves one better, creating a device that can form and control those bullets in water.

The nonlinear acoustic lens is constructed from chains strung with stainless-steel spheres that are oriented parallel to one another - and squeezed together - to form an array.

The gadget was inspired by Newton's cradle, a popular toy that consists of a line of identical balls suspended by wires from a frame. When an end ball is pulled back and released, it slams into the next ball, causing the last ball in the line to fly outward.

Similarly, in the acoustic lens, striking one end of the array generates compact nonlinear pulses of sound - solitary waves that propagate through the lens and can be tightly focused on a target area; when they coalesce at this focal point, they produce a significantly amplified version: the sound bullet.

These intense pressure waves may be used to obliterate tumors or kidney stones - leaving surrounding tissues unharmed - or probe objects like ship hulls or bridges for unseen defects.

In the new work, the lens has been made more accurate, and a waterproof interface, which efficiently transmitted the pulses, was inserted between the chains and water.

"We use water as a target medium with the idea that the acoustic lens could be used for underwater imaging and/or biomedical applications," says postdoc Carly Donahue, who helped refine the device.

"Currently, our work is fundamental in nature. We are focused on demonstrating proof of principle and establishing the technical strengths and weaknesses, which will inform the future design of engineering devices for specific applications," she adds.

"For example, using these systems in biomedical applications requires reducing their dimensions and learning about the related scaling effects. Creating commercially viable devices will require the involvement of industrial partners."


Related Links
American Institute of Physics
Hospital and Medical News at InternDaily.com

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Get Our Free Newsletters
Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear


Simplifying Heart Surgery with Stretchable Electronic Devices
Chicago IL (SPX) Nov 20, 2012
Researchers at the McCormick School of Engineering are part of a team that has used stretchable electronics to create a multipurpose medical catheter that can both monitor heart functions and perform corrections on heart tissue during surgery. The device marks the first time stretchable electronics have been applied to a surgical process known as cardiac ablation, a milestone that could lead to ... read more

Victims of Hurricane Sandy forgotten in Haiti

Post-storm, New Yorkers love Bloomberg - and Chris Christie

UN agency faces aid deficit ahead of Madagascar storms

European reconstruction bank admits Kosovo

Mobile GPS Tracking capability on JCB ruggedized mobile phones

Quattro Group Gains Visibility And Control With Ctrack

Saudi Arabia to Launch Two Satellites

Nokia buys 3D mapping firm in location services push

A 3-D light switch for the brain

Scientists improve dating of early human settlement

Archaeologists identify spear tips used in hunting a half-million years ago

Oldest home in Scotland unearthed

Singapore gets dolphins after tussle with activists

Ecuador's Lonesome George wasn't lonely after all

S.Africa rhino toll jumps as poachers kill 7 in attack

Research finds evidence of a 'mid-life crisis' in great apes

G.Bissau warns AIDS patients without treatment since coup

UN hails sharp decline in HIV infections in kids

Baiting Mosquitoes with Knowledge and Proven Insecticides

Scientists question the designation of some emerging diseases

China names new leaders for Shanghai, Chongqing

China angst over runaway boys' deaths

Two detained in China for 'inciting unrest' online

Two more Tibetans in China self-immolate: reports

Piracy will swell again if seas not policed: S.African Navy

Mekong River attackers get death sentences

West African pirates target oil tankers

Pirate killed off Somali coast: NATO

BoJ chief slaps down would-be PM's challenge

China manufacturing grows in November: HSBC

Foreign investment in China drops in October

China says US overtakes EU as its top export market

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement